My Style

MAWC2013 Day 2: Anything But Basic Black

I can’t believe Day 2 of Market America World Conference is over.  Since I didn’t have to go on stage today (except with Alejandro Sanz, who performed live at the end of the show!), I was a little more low key in a 5th Connection jumpsuit, Balmain belt and jacket and another pair of fabulous Tom Ford shoes. You can never go wrong with black and statement accessories – that belt is EVERYTHING. JR also wore Tom Ford, his favorite.

MAWC2013 Day 1: Wardrobe Lookbook with La La Anthony and Amber Ridinger

 

MAWC2013 Day 2: Anything But Basic Blackloren-ridinger-makeup-claudia-betancur

jr-loren-ridinger-style-mawc2013

My daughter Amber also wore black today! She looked effortlessly chic in black Zara pants, a beautiful 3.1 Philip Lim top, Christian Louboutin heels and Loren Jewels earrings. Duane also wore Zara with a Dolce and Gabbana shirt.

amber-ridinger-lumiere-de-vie-skincare

amber-ridinger-zara-mawc2013Since tomorrow is our last day here at the American Airlines Arena (until next year!) I think we might film a video about what we’re all wearing to make it extra special – what do you think? Let me know in the comments! xo

 

 

By: lorenr
Published:

8 Responses to “MAWC2013 Day 2: Anything But Basic Black”

February 01, 2013 at 9:14 pm, Dee Trillo said:

Dear Loren,

It was amazing meeting you and having a chance to hear you talking about your life, career, family and personal journey. You are truly an inspiration, not only because you are a successful business woman, but because you show your heart in every thing you say. I was truly amazed by your kind and charming personality and how you seek to help others with every experience you acquire.
Thank you again for your time and for been so warm! Looking forward to seeing you (maybe in New York for Fashion Week), and your wonderful family again, and witnessing you been the “success study” ;)
Big hug!
Dee Trillo

Reply

February 02, 2013 at 8:00 pm, emma said:

yes Loren please do! always love ur fashionable sense!!!

Reply

February 02, 2013 at 10:28 pm, Nancy Eurotas said:

Not Everybody can afford your kind of Clothes.

You look Beautiful!!

Reply

February 03, 2013 at 2:09 am, janice said:

I’ve never been able to figure out why such importance is placed on the price tag or where one shops or if it is a designer. The price of clothes/accessories don’t make a person. I like to look nice and dress in style just like anyone else, but do so for MUCH less. Having said that… all four of you look very lovely and I bet you could all have looked equally as nice, without the price tag :^)

Reply

February 03, 2013 at 12:47 pm, Marlene J.. Rydingsword said:

A fashion video would be very much appreciated .

Marlene

Reply

February 09, 2013 at 6:21 pm, Jane in CT said:

Janice, maybe this will help you understand, as I hear it as a genuine inquiry. You are correct, price/designer/store do not matter, nor do they make the person. Fashion, like cars, advertising, computers, food, art, architecture, etc., all require people to figure out what something is going to look like, how it’s going to function, what materials it will be made from, how it’s going to be marketed. All those people contribute to our economy through their having jobs and their being able to allocate parts of their incomes to necessities and fun. Without the high-end creativity of the best of the best, others are denied the inspiration and challenge of repurposing it to their needs and wants. Think of it as cross-pollination. Knowledge of what makes an item excellent adds distinctions of quality vs. shoddy, creative vs. mundane, attractive vs. ugly, and so on. While price doesn’t necessarily mean excellent, many times it does. People who think [designers, scientists, for example] need time and should be paid for it. The auto industry makes concept cars to push the envelope of what could, in a few years, be the next innovation. Apple, with its commitment to making beautiful and easy-to-use technology, raised the bar for all to follow. Remember what PCs used to look like? Many of us aspire to a higher income level, and the freedom that brings to splurge on a special thing or three to admire as a treasure. Some of it is wearable, some of it sits in a garage or on a table. What Loren provides in this blog is a look into a world many of us cannot access. How great it is for her to roam around all those fashion venues and, using her filter of what’s fashionable and touted in the moment, show us what’s out there. While Laboutin shoes are out of my range and lifestyle, I appreciate them for the art they are. I also will look for an affordable version that has been inspired by them, or maybe find a pair in a thrift shop. In closing: A few years ago, my husband and I were invited to a New Year’s evening gown/tuxedo dinner. I found a $3500 Escada designer gown at a store closing for $55. Because I had the knowledge, I knew what an incredible deal this was [besides the original price tag being on it]. The best part was wearing it and knowing I looked fabulous and comfortable, and that the others who recognized quality knew it, too. I wore the gown, it didn’t wear me. I felt like the 10 cow bride [that's a good parable to look up]. So, go easier on Loren. She’s providing an incredible service and education to us.

Reply

February 09, 2013 at 6:30 pm, Jane in CT said:

Janice, maybe this will help you understand, as I hear it as a genuine inquiry. You are correct, price/designer/store do not matter, nor do they make the person. Fashion, like cars, advertising, computers, food, art, architecture, etc., all require people to figure out what something is going to look like, how it’s going to function, what materials it will be made from, how it’s going to be marketed. All those people contribute to our economy through their having jobs and their being able to allocate parts of their incomes to necessities and fun. Without the high-end creativity of the best of the best, others are denied the inspiration and challenge of repurposing it to their needs and wants. Think of it as cross-pollination. Knowledge of what makes an item excellent adds distinctions of quality vs. shoddy, creative vs. mundane, attractive vs. ugly, and so on. While price doesn’t necessarily mean excellent, many times it does. People who think [designers, scientists, for example] need time and should be paid for it. The auto industry makes concept cars to push the envelope of what could, in a few years, be the next innovation. Apple, with its commitment to making beautiful and easy-to-use technology, raised the bar for all to follow. Remember what PCs used to look like? Many of us aspire to a higher income level, and the freedom that brings to splurge on a special thing or three to admire as a treasure. Some of it is wearable, some of it sits in a garage or on a table. What Loren provides in this blog is a look into a world many of us cannot access. How great it is for her to roam around all those fashion venues and, using her filter of what’s fashionable and touted in the moment, show us what’s out there. While Louboutin shoes are out of my range and lifestyle, I appreciate them for the art they are. I also will look for an affordable version that has been inspired by them, or maybe find a pair in a thrift shop. In closing: A few years ago, my husband and I were invited to a New Year’s evening gown/tuxedo dinner. I found a $3500 Escada designer gown at a store closing for $55. Because I had the knowledge, I knew what an incredible deal this was [besides the original price tag being on it]. The best part was wearing it and knowing I looked fabulous and comfortable, and that the others who recognized quality knew it, too. I wore the gown, it didn’t wear me. I felt like the 10 cow bride [that's a good parable to look up]. So, go easier on Loren. She’s providing an incredible service and education to us.

Reply

February 11, 2013 at 1:21 am, janice said:

Jane….I appreciate your post! I may not have made myself clear in mine. I fully understand capitalism and what goes into manfacturing a product. That’s what makes this country so great! However, I’d be willing to bet that all the research, time, advertising etc. that went into that pair of Louboutin shoes, for example, doesn’t warrant such an exorbantant price tag. There are other designers that make an equally fashionable shoe and possibly more comfortable one, no where near that price. As you know, what also is factored into a price is the PROFIT margin. Some are going to get rich faster depending on the market they go after and how much of a profit margin they set. I’m not saying there is necessarily anything wrong with that, but I think there comes a point of absurdity. We are blessed to live in such a wonderful country that affords us the privilege to reach our potential . That’s not what I’m referring to. What I find so interesting is that a person would OVERPRICE their creativity. Brand names demand a higher price. Why? A few reasons. One being some clothes/accessories are made from a better quality material and one would expect to pay more (but how much more?) for that product than ones that use cheaper quality and therefore won’t last as long or look as good. I believe there is a point where an design can definitely be OVERPRICED, not necessarily because it is that much of a better product, but because they think their product is worth that much more, therefore they demand a much higher price making their profit margin larger. I think common sense could tell one that a person who may buy a Louboutin, probably isn’t going to wear it on a daily basis and therefore the quality doesn’t matter that much to the point of it having to have such superior quality (and does it really?) thus reflecting such a high price. So is it necessary to have such superior quality when it isn’t needed for the durablity of the length it will be worn? Somewhere in here it can become a matter of just having to have whatever that high priced item is because of the name/status behind it more than the quality/price. I ABSOLUTELY believe that the designer must be paid for their creativity and talent. But that can be pretty subjective. I can appreciate the “art” of a Louboutin, but is it really worth the price tag? I’m not sure that putting studs all over a shoe, is something that is extremely creative, but that’s just my opinion. Some obviously think so. The bottom line….most people work very hard for their salary, no matter what it is. If a person can afford it, then they have every right to buy whatever they want, not necessarily what they need ( a distinct difference). Can someone rock an expensive designer dress? Of course, just as someone can rock a dress with a modest price tag, especially if it was a good find at a consigment store and not necessarily a designer. I’ve worn both, except the designer dress wasn’t in the thousands of dollars price range. I just wonder why is it important to be recognized or have others recognize us for the brand/cost of what we are wearing? When I see a dress, it doesn’t matter to me whether it is a designer or not, it doesn’t even enter my mind. What I see is a woman wearing a style/design that looks well on her. This whole discussion can come down to just a difference of opinion, lifestyle, values, etc. That doesn’t make one of us better than the other, just different. And YES it is nice to have Loren be so informative on the fashion front. Thank you Loren! As you posted back to me……you put highend and otherwise fashion statements for us to see and I understand that. I will try to keep price out of my postings, as I just explained why I think the way I do. Obviously, I’m more opinionated than some and don’t apologize for that, but I do, if my delivery comes across as offensive. I am definetly a person that stands on principle and that can puzzle some and offend others. The exact tone is easier to be misrepresented in an email/posting, rather than in person. I will also work on my delivery, so that it will be better understood and hopefully not appear so offensive.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ 2 = eleven

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>